BA

Geography / Welsh History

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You are viewing this course for September start 2022

By choosing to study the BA Geography / Welsh History course at Aberystwyth University, you will have the opportunity to study in two highly renowned departments that are innovative in their teaching and research. These are the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, and the Department of History and Welsh History. The Geography / Welsh History degree scheme is interesting and exciting and combines the expertise of geographers and historians in a joint honours course that provides you with a great deal of flexibility when choosing modules.

Course Overview

Why study Geography and Welsh History at Aberystwyth?

  • The geography elements of this course combine human and physical geography, so you will experience a full variety of the discipline across the human and physical processes that form landscapes and places throughout the world. You will also study the political and environmental subjects that arise in the relationship between man and the earth. We use examples from all around the world, but many of our modules focus mainly on Wales and its geography and environment.
  • Most of us are curious about the past and about the way in which human society has evolved over time. As well as being interesting in itself, studying the history offers a vision that can help us to understand events in the world today. The history elements of the degree course will enable you to put the past in perspective by nurturing the skills of analysis, interpretation and communication that are so important to everyday life.
  • The two departments are located in the middle of the University campus and there is a close-knit and friendly community in both. Aberystwyth is an excellent place to study Geography - situated as it is on beautiful Cardigan bay between the sea and mountains. The Department of Geography and Earth Sciences is home to state of the art laboratories and computer rooms and as part of the course you will undertake intense field work and have the opportunity to travel.
  • In the recent Research Excellence Framework assessment un 2014, ADGD was named as the best Geography department in Wales, with 78% of the research being acknowledged as internationally outstanding. The Department is also ranked in the top 15 Geography Departments in the United Kingdom based on the power of research, which is measured by the quality of the research as well as the number of staff that undertake research within the Department.
  • There are more than 30 staff lecturers in the Department, so we can teach a large variety of specialist modules across a wide variety of subjects - from climate change and how volcanic explosions have an effect on the environment, to contemporary geo-danger tendencies, the disappearance of a large number of species, forensic science, urban sustainability, regional development, and the future of the state-nation.
  • The Department's degree schemes attract a high level of student satisfaction consistently and that is acknowledged in the annual National Student Survey (NSS). During the last five years we have won the highest general student satisfaction for our degree schemes.
  • It has been possible to study History at Aberystwyth since the University was established in 1872, and over the last 140 years we have perfected the degree schemes that we offer to make certain that you have the best possible History degree.
  • There is a lively History society that arrange lectures by key speakers, visits to areas of interest and social events throughout the year. We also have a number of connections with universities abroad, which means you can take advantage of the opportunity to spend time studying abroad enjoying different historical cultures.
  • The interests of our lecturers vary from prehistoric times to the modern world, which means we can offer history modules on culture, economics, society and politics from across the ages. All of the lecturers are also active researchers as well. In the Research Excellence Framework in 2014, about 95% of research that was held at Aberystwyth University was of a standard that is acknowledged internationally. So, we can give you the opportunity to develop your historical talents and interests by studying closely with tutors that specialise in their fields. We put a great emphasis on learning in small groups, and we are almost unique for providing one-to-one tutorial sessions. This will be a big advantage for you as a student.
  • As well as the University's excellent library - the Hugh Owen Library, Aberystwyth University students can also enjoy full membership of the National Library of Wales which is situated just below the Campus. There are only five copyright libraries in the UK and our National Library is one of them. It holds more than 6 million books, maps and all this is 5 minutes from the campus and is an extremely valuable resource.
Our Staff

Department of Geography and Earth Science: lecturers are all qualified to PhD level or working towards a PhD.

Staff in the Department of History and Welsh History are active researchers and experts in their field of History. Most are qualified to PhD level and hold PGCHE. To find out more about our staff visit, please visit our departmental staff page.

Modules September start - 2022

Please note: The modules listed below are those currently intended for delivery during the next academic year and may be subject to change. They are included here to give an indication of how the course is structured.

Core

Module Name Module Code Credit Value
Place and Identity GS14220 20

Options

Module Name Module Code Credit Value
Europe and the World, 1000-2000 HY12420 20
Medieval and Early Modern Britain and Europe, 1000-1800 HY11420 20
People, Power and Identity: Wales 1200-1999 WH11720 20
The Modern World, 1789 to the present HY11820 20

Core

Module Name Module Code Credit Value
Geographical Information Systems GS23710 10

Options

Module Name Module Code Credit Value
An Age of Empire: Britain and Ireland, 1850-1914 HY26920 20
Between Revolution and Reform: China since 1800 HY28520 20
Crime, Riot and Morality in Wales 1750-1850 WH23420 20
European Society and the Medieval Mind 1200-1500 HY25820 20
From Poor Law to Welfare State: Poverty and Welfare in Modern Britain, 1815-1948 HY29220 20
Globalising Post-War Germany(s) 1945-2015 HY29520 20
Knighthood and Chivalry in high medieval England, 1066-1300 HY20420 20
Media and Society in Twentieth Century Britain HY27520 20
Modern American History HY28320 20
Modern Japan: From Samurai to Salary Men HY29820 20
Modern Welsh Society, 1868-1950 WH24420 20
Science, Religion and Magic HY28620 20
The Atlantic World, 1492-1825 HY29720 20
The British Isles in the Long Eighteenth Century HY22020 20
The European Reformation HY26520 20
The Great Divergence: Europe and Asia, c.1300-c.1800 HY26320 20
The Making of Europe: Christendom and beyond, c. 1000-1300 HY25720 20
The Nazi Dictatorship: Regime and Society in Germany 1933-1945 HY29420 20
The Rise of Modern Medicine, c.1750-2000 HY27320 20
The Tudors: A European Dynasty? HY20920 20
Wales and the Kings of Britain: Conflict, Power and Identities in the British Isles 1039-1417 WH20120 20
Wales under the Tudors WH23520 20
Concepts for Geographers GS20410 10
Geographical Perspectives on the Sustainable Society GS28910 10
Placing Culture GS22920 20
Quantitative Data Analysis GS23810 10
American History skills module HY25020 20
Dread and Despair? Living with Disability in the Middle Ages HY23320 20
Exploring Nineteenth-Century Exhibitions HY24620 20
From Babylon Berlin to Hollywood: movies as sources for cultural history HY24920 20
History as myth-Making: the 'Myth of the Blitz' HY23420 20
Image Wars in Southeast Asia: Studying 20th Century Propaganda HY23720 20
Memory, Myth and History: Investigating Medieval Chronicles, c. 1000-1250 HY24120 20

Core

Module Name Module Code Credit Value

Options

Module Name Module Code Credit Value
Contemporary Global Migration GS39120 20
Everyday Social Worlds GS33320 20
Geographies of the Global Countryside GS36820 20
Memory Cultures: heritage, identity and power GS37920 20
Modern British Landscapes GS36220 20
The psychosocial century GS30020 20
Urban Risk and Environmental Resilience GS37520 20
An Age of Empire: Britain and Ireland, 1850-1914 HY36920 20
Between Revolution and Reform: China since 1800 HY38520 20
Crime, Riot and Morality in Wales 1750-1850 WH33420 20
Culture, Society and the Victorians HY39320 20
European Society and the Medieval Mind 1200-1500 HY35820 20
From Poor Law to Welfare State: Poverty and Welfare in Modern Britain, 1815-1948 HY39220 20
Globalising Post-War Germany(s) 1945-2015 HY39520 20
Knighthood and Chivalry in high medieval England, 1066-1300 HY30420 20
Media and Society in Twentieth Century Britain HY37520 20
Modern American History HY38820 20
Modern Japan: From Samurai to Salary Men HY39820 20
Modern Welsh Society, 1868-1950 WH34420 20
Science, Religion and Magic HY38620 20
The Atlantic World, 1492-1825 HY39720 20
The British Isles in the Long Eighteenth Century HY30120 20
The European Reformation HY36520 20
The Great Divergence: Europe and Asia, c.1300-c.1800 HY36320 20
The Making of Europe: Christendom and beyond, c. 1000-1300 HY35720 20
The Nazi Dictatorship: Regime and Society in Germany 1933-1945 HY39420 20
The Rise of Modern Medicine, c.1750-2000 HY37320 20
The Tudors: A European Dynasty? HY30920 20
Wales and the Kings of Britain: Conflict, Power and Identities in the British Isles 1039-1417 WH30120 20
Wales under the Tudors WH33520 20

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Careers

What can I do with a degree in Geography / Welsh History?

Our graduates have secured jobs as environmental advisers, planners, civil servants, surveyors and professionals in the education sector, amongst others.

Employability is an integral part of all the courses that we offer. Our degrees offer a strong foundation for a wide variety of careers across a range of sectors. In a global economy that is rapidly changing, our graduates can call on a range of transferable skills, ensuring that they are always in demand.

These skill sets include:

  • better mathematical and computer skills
  • effective problem-solving and creative thinking
  • strong information technology skills
  • the ability to work independently and as part of a team
  • time management
  • written and oral communication skills, in speech and writing
  • self-motivation and self-dependency.

Year in Employment Scheme (YES) and Student Placements

Work experience during your degree is a good way of improving your chances of getting a job after you graduate. To help with this, students of the Department are encouraged to take part in the Year in Employment Scheme during the second and final years of their degree, which means spending 12 months doing paid work before completing their degree.

Bursaries are also available to support shorter student placements during the holiday. Every year, we hold a competition and invite students to share their work experiences in the form of reports and oral presentations, and the winners receive a prize and feedback from members of the business community that make up the panel of judges.

International Opportunities

Along with gaining experience of the world of work, independent travel is also acknowledged as a key element of student development. To support it, we offer bursaries to help with undergraduate travels. Amongst the recent locations were Uganda, Madagascar, Peru, Mount Etna and the United Sates.

The Department has also established Erasmus Exchange Programmes with Bergen University, Oulu University, Finland and the University’s Centre in Svalbard, while offering the unique opportunity for students to study in one of the world’s most extreme environments. We also have strong connections with a number of universities in North America, where students can complete their second year of studies. During the last few years, our Exchange Coordinator has overseen locations in Purdue University in Indiana, Alabama University, Georgia University, Montana University and Ottawa University in Canada. 

Course Content

What will you learn?

  • The Geography elements of this course combine modules on Human and Physical Geography that encompass every aspect of the discipline. You will study relevant and contemporary subjects that vary from the local to the international. You will experience the excitement of learning about the physical and human world not only in lectures but also through learning provision that is amongst the most innovating in the UK.
  • The first-year core modules of the Geography elements of the scheme contain four modules through the medium of Welsh: ‘Living with Risk’, ‘People and Place’, ‘The Welsh Environment’ and ‘Countryside and City’ as well as the tutorial module. You can also choose one optional module through the medium of Welsh which is ‘Environmental Field Methodology’.
  • In your second and third years, the core tutorial modules and the Dissertation are studied through the medium of Welsh, as well as the core modules ‘Geography Field Work’ and ‘Locating Politics’. There are a number of specialist Welsh-medium optional modules available too, including ‘River Catchments’, ‘Environmental History’, ‘the Geography of Nationalism’, and Environmental History.
  • During your second year, you will study a module that explores the way that meaning, methods and writing in history have changed over time. You will also choose from a long list of modules that have been designed to broaden you knowledge, give you an opportunity to observe the craft of the historian, and focus on various subjects and periods of history in a more in-depth way.
  • In your third year, you will choose a special subject which will allow you to study a particular historical subject in more depth, as well as choose other modules from a long list.

How will you be taught?

  • The scheme has a flexible module structure that allows students to combine essential training in key geographical skills and specialist hobbies. As a student on the geography scheme, you will be taught through the medium of lectures, seminars, tutorial sessions, practical classes, field courses and independent surveys, and you will be assessed through a combination of formal examinations and course work, including essays, reports and presentations. You will also be assessed for work such as designing a website, give presentations, conducting experiments and research for your own independent project.
  • You will go on an introductory field trip at the start of your first year, which visits a number of places in the Aberystwyth area, and which also presents some of the main subjects that we will be discussed throughout the year. It’s also an excellent way of getting to know other students on your course.
  • The primary objective of the History syllabus at Aberystwyth is to convey the variety and excitement of the contemporary approaches to studying History, and learning key skills such as discovering information, interpretation and self-expression. You will be assessed through a variety of methods such as traditional examinations, open examinations, essays that are assessed, projects and presentations, and dissertation. This is a way for you to accomplish your potential and reach your learning goals.
  • The Department of History and Welsh History is committed to one-to-one tutorials and small seminar group teaching alongside traditional lectures, and we also introduce innovative learning of a high standard which will help you to reach your potential. Reading before coming to seminars means that you can play a full part in the discussions and the sharing of ideas that will take place. As there will be only a small number of students in each seminar group you will get a lot of attention from the lecturers.
  • The personal tutoring gives you the opportunity to receive one-to-one attention and useful feedback from the lecturer on your coursework. Coursework will help you to develop your ability to research, interpret and present an argument in an organised and logical way, while seminars are helpful for improving your presenting skills. 

Typical Entry Requirements

UCAS Tariff 120 - 96

A Levels BBB-CCC

GCSE requirements (minimum grade C/4):
English or Welsh

BTEC National Diploma:
DDM-MMM

International Baccalaureate:
30-26

European Baccalaureate:
75%-65% overall

English Language Requirements:
See our Undergraduate English Language Requirements for this course. Pre-sessional English Programmes are also available for students who do not meet our English Language Requirements.

Country Specific Entry Requirements:
International students whose qualification is not listed on this page, can check our Country Specific Entry Requirements for further information.

The University welcomes undergraduate applications from students studying the Access to Higher Education Diploma or T-level qualifications, provided that relevant subject content and learning outcomes are met. We are not able to accept Access to Higher Education Diplomas or T-levels as a general qualification for every undergraduate degree course.
Our inclusive admissions policy values breadth as well as depth of study. Applicants are selected on their own individual merits and offers can vary. If you would like to check the eligibility of your qualifications before submitting an application, please contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office for advice and guidance.

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