BSc

Criminology

Key Facts

Code M900
  • Typical A-level offer

    BBC

  • Course Length

    3 Years

Further details on entry requirements

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Our degree in Criminology will enable you to develop an understanding of the causes of crime and the impact crime has on individuals, communities and the wider society.  You will also study the current challenges facing the criminal justice system.  Criminology is multidisciplinary in nature and therefore when studying crime causation and crime reduction you will draw information from a diverse range of disciplines, including psychology, sociology and law.  Modules in criminology research methods will also provide you with key technical and analytical skills necessary to engage in contemporary debates surrounding policies and practices designed to prevent crime.  On completion of your degree, you will possess a repertoire of skills essential for pursuing a professional career in areas such as policing, prisons and youth justice. 

Aberystwyth Law School: 82% student satisfaction (NSS 2016)

100% of undergraduates who graduated from the Aberystwyth Law School in 2015 were in employment or further education six months after graduating (DLHE 2015)

  • Overview
  • Modules
  • Employability
  • Teaching & Learning
  • Student Views

Overview

Why study Criminology at Aberystwyth University?

  • The degree provides a balanced coverage of theory, policy and practice issues in criminology and criminal justice studies.
  • The current teaching team comprises staff with expertise in the main disciplines that inform criminological study, such as psychology, sociology and law.
  • Our modules are continually revised and updated to reflect recent changes in patterns of criminal behaviour and crime policy responses.
  • You will be taught by criminologists who are actively engaged in research.
  • There are opportunities to undertake a criminal justice placement.
  • Students can undertake supervised independent criminological research.
  • We have an excellent working relationship with local criminal justice agencies.
Our Staff

Aberystwyth Law School lecturers are mostly either qualified to PHD level or have professional experience and qualifications as practicing lawyers. Many staff also have a PGCE (Higher Education).

Modules

Please note: The modules listed below are those currently intended for delivery during the next academic year and may be subject to change. They are included here to give an indication of how the course is structured.

Employability

The degree will not only help you to develop a range of key transferable skills that are important for employment in general, but will also provide specialist skills and knowledge relevant to a professional career in a criminal justice setting (e.g. police, probation or prison service). 

Your future is important to us and our degrees will equip you with the following:

  •  the ability to communicate clearly and concisely in both written and oral forms;
  • enhance your problem-solving and creative thinking skills;
  • the ability to work independently and as a team member;
  •  time management and organisation skills;
  • encourage self-motivation and self-reliance;
  • transferable skills, such as computer literacy and key research skills relating to both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis.

What opportunities are there as a student at Aberystwyth Law School?

Click here to find out about the various opportunities that our Aberystwyth University Careers team offer.

Enhance your employability prospects with GO Wales and YES (Year in Employment Scheme) managed by our Careers department. 

Teaching & Learning

The teaching programme is designed to provide you with a detailed insight into the nature and causes of crime and help you develop a critical understanding of the politics of criminal justice policy.

The breakdown below will provide you with an illustration of what you may study during the three year degree scheme.

In your first year you will be introduced to:

  • sociological and psychological approaches to the study of criminal behaviour;
  • criminal law and the workings of the criminal justice system;
  • basic research skills in criminology.

In your second and third years you will have the opportunity to:

  • develop your understanding of the relationship between theory, research and criminal justice practice;
  • enhance your criminology research skills;
  • conduct independent research on a topic of your own choosing;
  • undertake  a voluntary work placement in a criminal justice setting;
  • choose from a long list of elective modules including:
  • Critical Perspectives on Imprisonment;
  •  Police, Policing and Society;
  • Youth Crime and Youth Justice;
  • Psychology and Crime.

How will I be taught?

A wide variety of teaching methods are used. You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, workshops and practical classes.   High quality teaching and supervision will enable you to realise your full potential.  You will be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning and work on projects both individually and in groups.

A number of different types of assessment are used throughout the undergraduate programme.  In addition to essays and written exams, you will undertake practical exercises (e.g. conducting a qualitative interview) and give individual and group presentations.  You will receive constructive feedback on all coursework assignments.

You will be assigned a personal tutor, who will be the key contact when you have issues or queries.

There is an opportunity to complete a Personal Development Plan (PDP) at Aberystwyth. This is a structured process of self-appraisal, reflection, and planning, which will enable you to chart your personal, academic and professional development throughout your time at university. By recording your academic performance, and highlighting the skills you already have and those you will need for future employability, the PDP portfolio will equip you with the necessary tools to plan effectively, develop successful approaches to study, and consider your future career options and aspirations.

Student Views

Criminology is a really interesting course, combining lots of different elements such as history and psychology in order to understand crime and the criminal justice system. There is a wide range of interesting modules to study, including elements of criminology, victims and crime control and prevention. Robert Wade

Entry Requirements

A Levels BBC

GCSE requirements (grade C min):
English or Welsh, Mathematics

BTEC National Diploma:
DMM

International Students

International Baccalaureate:
28 points overall

European Baccalaureate:
65% overall

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